By 2021, cybercrimes will cost companies USD 6 trillion, according to a study.

The number of internet users has grown from an estimated at 2 billion in 2015 to 4.4 billion in 2019, but so have the cybercrimes which are expected to cost companies USD 6 trillion worldwide, according to a study by Cybersecurity Ventures.

Similarly, the number of smartphone users has grown from 2.5 billion in 2016 to 3.2 billion in 2019 and is forecasted to grow to 3.8 billion by 2021. Smartphones and the internet will make further inroads to our economic system. But there are certain risks involved as well.

Mobile phones are becoming targets of cybercriminals because of their widespread use and increasing computing power. Consider the fact that more than 60 % of online fraud occurs through mobile phones. This threat is not just towards individual users but businesses as well. It does not matter how large the company is either. 43% of the cyberattacks in 2019 were aimed at smaller businesses because they do not have adequate protection.

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The way we work and the spaces we work in have evolved considerably in the last fifty years. Corporate culture is nothing like what it used to be back in the 80’s and 90’s. Cabins and cubicles have given way to open offices. Many in the work-force today prefer to work remotely and maintain flexible hours. As such, hot-desking is common in many multi-national companies including those who have large office spaces. As the start-up culture evolved, there was a need for multiple small offices. This growing breed of self-employed professionals and start-up owners need other resources that are commonly required in the office environment like printers, shredders, Wi-Fi, meeting rooms, video-conferencing abilities etc . They also need a common place to meet people, network and exchange ideas because working solo could be monotonous at some time. Co-working has provided an all-in-one solution for the needs of such individuals and small groups of people by providing a common space where equipment and utilities could be shared between businesses who rent the space. Co-working spaces have thus become very popular across the world and especially in cities where real-estate is very expensive. According to statistics the number of co-working spaces has increase by 205% between 2014 and 2018

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While it may be true that nobody can predict the future, when it comes to cybersecurity you can give it a good go. By looking at the security developments that we have witnessed over the past few years, it is perfectly possible to forecast what is likely to happen in the near future.

Plus, with 2020 just around the corner, now is the time to do exactly that. Staying ahead of the game and doing all you can to avoid the risk of a cyber-attack is vital; and what better way is there to do just that than by preparing yourself in advance.

From the rise of 5G to the implementation of AI, here are five cybersecurity predictions for the coming year.

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Despite its negative connotations, the Dark Web is nothing to be afraid of. Few know that the Dark Web was actually thought out as a means of preserving privacy and security. However, this also enabled it to become a breeding ground for illegal activity.

There are certainly things to be distrustful of when navigating the Dark Web, and before venturing into it head-first, you should understand certain things about it.

What is the Dark Web?

The first thing you need to know is that there is no actual database for the Dark Web. Instead, there are only what are known as “peer to peer connections”, which means that the data you are accessing is not stored in just one place.

Instead, it is found on thousands of different computers that are part of the network, so that no one can actually identify where the information is coming from. You can upload to the network, but when downloading, there is no telling where you’re getting the data from.

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“I’ve read that my web hosting provider’s website that they have a good security solution in place to protect me against hackers.”

This is a pretty common answer that a lot of bloggers and small business owners gave me when I ask them if they know about how secure their web hosting is. Also, they often add that their budgets are pretty tight so they’ve chosen to go with “an affordable provider.” By “affordable,” of course, they mean ‘ridiculously cheap.”

Come on, people.

Do you really think that a cheap web hosting has everything in place to stop a website attack? Do you think that they will protect you from all types of hacker attacks?

While I don’t know everything about how web hosting providers choose security solutions, I can tell you with some confidence that a lot of them have laughable solutions.

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Some businesses – usually those that have never experienced any kind of major IT incident – think of cybercrime as an inconvenience. They may believe that if their company is hacked it will cause some disruption and perhaps an embarrassing news story, but that ultimately the breach will have only a minor effect.

However, the truth is that cybercrime can have a huge range of unexpected consequences. Here we take a lot of the real impact of a breach – cybercrime might affect you a lot more than you think.

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Businesses need to take their cyber security seriously. There are huge financial implications for being hacked, not just from the perspective of lost revenue and weakened reputation, but also in the form of stricter regulations from laws such as the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). However, there are a number of myths about cyber security that make it difficult for companies to know what the best course of action is. Here are four myths about cyber security that are still affecting British businesses.

Myth #1: Cyber security is purely dealt with by the IT department

One commonly held myth that can actually put businesses at risk is the idea that cyber security is something that the IT department (and only the IT department needs to be concerned about). Of course, it is necessary to provide your IT team with the budget and resources to defend your business against the risk of a cyber-attack.

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It is not a secret that many people nowadays do not pay much attention when they surf the web at home or at work. There are new data breaches and exploits on a daily basis and still avoiding to take any precautions may result in a catastrophic consequences. Even the biggest corporations are paying millions of dollars so they can improve their cybersecurity and remain safe. However, if you still believe in some of the cybersecurity myths you may put your own computer or even your whole organization to a huge risk. We from CyberDB have decided to bust some of the top 5 cyber security myths and make it clear for you.

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Trump Cybersecurity background

The White House has recently published its new National Cyber Strategy, rescinding an Obama-era memorandum Presidential Policy Directive-20 (PPD-20) that laid forth the process by which the United States would undertake cyber attacks against cyber foes, to include foreign state actors.  The Strategy consists of four primary pillars designed to guide how the United States will undergo defensive, and perhaps more importantly, offensive actions in order to preserve its interests in cyberspace.  Per the Strategy, the four pillars are:

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Iran Cyberspace picture

There has been recent focus on alleged Iran cyber activity the past few weeks, spurned on by the publication of a vendor report on Iranian operations.  Per the vendor’s findings, not only was Iran likely behind the activity that was targeting government and private sector in the Middle East, it was implementing National Security Agency exploits that were stolen and dumped into the public domain by the Shadow Brokers group in April 2017.  As recently as late August 2018, Iran is suspected of trying to launch influence operations ahead of the midterm elections.  The conclusion is that Iran is increasingly using asymmetric attacks, particularly via cyberspace, as part of its tool box to conduct retaliatory attacks.

The new reporting comes at a time when Russia’s cyber malfeasance has largely dominated the press, due to its influence operations efforts and election shenanigans, not just in the United States but in other countries as well.  Prior to the Russia focus, North Korea was the focal point with its suspected cyber activities targeting cryptocurrency, and the SWIFT banking transactions before that.  Iran was propelled onto the scene with Operation Ababil

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