The security breaches in cyber-security have been dominating the world for a long time. As cyber-attacks are growing rapidly, the chances of failing in this trap have been increasing. Having the necessary security measures in place still does not indicate that the IT infrastructure is free from risks. To ensure a better working environment and avoid cyber attacks, businesses must opt for penetration testing. Here are five reasons explaining why you should conduct penetration testing

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Understanding is the first step to combating Phishing: Types, Methodology & Prevention Tips 

According to the 2019 Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR) by Verizon, phishing is the leading cause of data breaches. The data also shows us that phishing is also widely utilized for cyber espionage with more than three-quarters of all known incidents involving phishing.

The statistics are also resonated by IBM’s findings in the 2019 Cost of a Data Breach report, where fifty-one per cent of incidents in all surveyed organizations involved malicious attacks with “malware infections, criminal insiders, phishing/social engineering and SQL injection.” 

Clearly, phishing continues to dominate as the one of the most persistent and highly effective tools of cyber-attacks. In this article, we will take an in-depth look at what phishing is, types of phishing and how to protect your business from these types of attacks.

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The global cloud computing market is set to reach $623.3 billion by 2023. The cloud is the ultimate tool in building highly scalable and flexible networks that can be set up in a flash. This offers a great opportunity for businesses looking to avoid high sunk costs in setting up infrastructure or, in phasing out legacy infrastructure components. Businesses of all shapes and sizes have realized the potential of cloud computing and have either already moved the whole or part of their operations to the cloud already or are in the process of migrating.

But the cloud is a shared resource and identity management, privacy and access control will always remain areas of concern for cloud-based businesses. Managing security for vulnerabilities throughout your operations network has become a top concern for businesses, especially in the wake of COVID-19, remote work and anywhere operations. As more and more people become dependent on the web for their daily work without being physically located in the protective womb of a physical business network, vulnerabilities have risen concomitantly with highly complex attacks, such as, DDoS (distributed denial of service) and Level 7 (application layer) attacks.

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Introduction

The IoT industry is currently booming at a rapid scale, allowing for insights backed by data to provide value to industries and enterprises. For instance, in supply chain, IoT is helping track the exact locations and condition of the cargo shipments to ensure that goods in transportation safely reach their destination. In agricultural sector, IoT devices help farmers to monitor changes in weather near crop fields to enhance labor, harvest health and water usage. Travel industry is making use of IoT sensors to notify on-arrival passengers when their luggage reaches the airport.

These and many more opportunities offered by IoT are making our lives easier and provide us with limitless services to enable increased work productivity and efficiency. However, its adoption is still not as widespread as anticipated. The reason is the security obstacles associated with IoT devices. In the year 2018, according to a survey by Bain & Company, security was the top reason for industrial and enterprise respondents to not adopt IoT technology. These security challenges can be overcome, but to understand how to do that, it’s important to first know what these challenges are.

Let us look at some of the many security threats faced by the Internet of Things.

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By 2021, cybercrimes will cost companies USD 6 trillion, according to a study.

The number of internet users has grown from an estimated at 2 billion in 2015 to 4.4 billion in 2019, but so have the cybercrimes which are expected to cost companies USD 6 trillion worldwide, according to a study by Cybersecurity Ventures.

Similarly, the number of smartphone users has grown from 2.5 billion in 2016 to 3.2 billion in 2019 and is forecasted to grow to 3.8 billion by 2021. Smartphones and the internet will make further inroads to our economic system. But there are certain risks involved as well.

Mobile phones are becoming targets of cybercriminals because of their widespread use and increasing computing power. Consider the fact that more than 60 % of online fraud occurs through mobile phones. This threat is not just towards individual users but businesses as well. It does not matter how large the company is either. 43% of the cyberattacks in 2019 were aimed at smaller businesses because they do not have adequate protection.

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While it may be true that nobody can predict the future, when it comes to cybersecurity you can give it a good go. By looking at the security developments that we have witnessed over the past few years, it is perfectly possible to forecast what is likely to happen in the near future.

Plus, with 2020 just around the corner, now is the time to do exactly that. Staying ahead of the game and doing all you can to avoid the risk of a cyber-attack is vital; and what better way is there to do just that than by preparing yourself in advance.

From the rise of 5G to the implementation of AI, here are five cybersecurity predictions for the coming year.

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Despite its negative connotations, the Dark Web is nothing to be afraid of. Few know that the Dark Web was actually thought out as a means of preserving privacy and security. However, this also enabled it to become a breeding ground for illegal activity.

There are certainly things to be distrustful of when navigating the Dark Web, and before venturing into it head-first, you should understand certain things about it.

What is the Dark Web?

The first thing you need to know is that there is no actual database for the Dark Web. Instead, there are only what are known as “peer to peer connections”, which means that the data you are accessing is not stored in just one place.

Instead, it is found on thousands of different computers that are part of the network, so that no one can actually identify where the information is coming from. You can upload to the network, but when downloading, there is no telling where you’re getting the data from.

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“I’ve read that my web hosting provider’s website that they have a good security solution in place to protect me against hackers.”

This is a pretty common answer that a lot of bloggers and small business owners gave me when I ask them if they know about how secure their web hosting is. Also, they often add that their budgets are pretty tight so they’ve chosen to go with “an affordable provider.” By “affordable,” of course, they mean ‘ridiculously cheap.”

Come on, people.

Do you really think that a cheap web hosting has everything in place to stop a website attack? Do you think that they will protect you from all types of hacker attacks?

While I don’t know everything about how web hosting providers choose security solutions, I can tell you with some confidence that a lot of them have laughable solutions.

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Some businesses – usually those that have never experienced any kind of major IT incident – think of cybercrime as an inconvenience. They may believe that if their company is hacked it will cause some disruption and perhaps an embarrassing news story, but that ultimately the breach will have only a minor effect.

However, the truth is that cybercrime can have a huge range of unexpected consequences. Here we take a lot of the real impact of a breach – cybercrime might affect you a lot more than you think.

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Trump Cybersecurity background

The White House has recently published its new National Cyber Strategy, rescinding an Obama-era memorandum Presidential Policy Directive-20 (PPD-20) that laid forth the process by which the United States would undertake cyber attacks against cyber foes, to include foreign state actors.  The Strategy consists of four primary pillars designed to guide how the United States will undergo defensive, and perhaps more importantly, offensive actions in order to preserve its interests in cyberspace.  Per the Strategy, the four pillars are:

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