Industrial espionage is a much more common occurrence than many people realize. As a business grows and begins to compete at a higher level, the stakes grow and their corporate secrets become more valuable. It isn’t just other businesses that might want this information, hackers who think they can sell the information will also be sniffing about.

Even if you can’t eliminate the risk entirely, there are certain things you can do to reduce the risk of a security breach in your business.

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Some businesses – usually those that have never experienced any kind of major IT incident – think of cybercrime as an inconvenience. They may believe that if their company is hacked it will cause some disruption and perhaps an embarrassing news story, but that ultimately the breach will have only a minor effect.

However, the truth is that cybercrime can have a huge range of unexpected consequences. Here we take a lot of the real impact of a breach – cybercrime might affect you a lot more than you think.

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Cybersecurity is the process of protecting and defending an enterprise’s use of cyberspace by detecting, preventing and responding to any of the malicious attacks like disabling, disrupting, injecting malware, or anything thing else aimed to harm the organization.

At its center, cybersecurity defends your organization from vicious and threat attacks aimed to disrupt and steal information from your organization. Cybersecurity risks are similar to financial and reputational risks as it could directly affect the organization’s growth, driving the costs up and adversely affecting the revenue.

If you’re a part of an organization, and especially, if your workplace stocks sensitive information of individuals or clients involved, then this is an ideal time to educate yourself regarding cybersecurity and ways to safeguard your organization against cyber attacks and threats with the help of professionals who hold cybersecurity certifications.

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Virtual Cybersecurity Labs

Cybercrime affecting businesses has become so widespread that IT and network security professionals are always thinking about that next breach and the costs of recovering from it. This increased risk has also raised the demand for better virtual defenses to prevent the loss of sensitive organizational data such as personal consumer details and internal communications.

There is a substantial need for cybersecurity training. It’s something that many businesses are interested in, but implementing the right system isn’t easy. Physical labs are expensive, require significant time and resources, and aligning everyone’s schedules is often impossible.

Virtual labs are a great way for you to provide your customers and partners with access to the latest cybersecurity product demos and training. These labs are accessible from anywhere, customers can engage with them on their terms, they cost less, and increase the overall quality of the training.

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If you don’t do your utmost best to ensure that your online store is safe to use, you could end up putting your customers in real danger. From their finances being stolen to their personal data being hacked into, any kind of trouble could befall your site’s users if you do not take cyber security seriously. Make sure, then, that you take it seriously!

When it comes to improving your online store’s cybersecurity measures, the following advice makes for essential reading.

Make your mobile payments safer

One of the most burgeoning e-commerce trends is mobile payment. As stated on Oberlo’s mobile shopping trends article, this is because this kind of transaction process prioritizes comfort, and it makes the buying process a whole lot simpler. You would be foolish not to grant your customers the opportunity to pay for things on your store via their mobile devices.

Allowing this kind of payment to take place does come with its fair share of drawbacks; however, the biggest one being that it isn’t always the safest form of transaction. This doesn’t mean that you can’t strengthen your mobile payment process, though. Some of the measures that you can and should put into place in this instance include:

  • Only ever using a trusted payment platform
  • Ensuring that your payment terminals are NFC-enabled
  • Encrypting your network to ensure sensitive information cannot be sent through it

Switch to HTTPS

In this day and age, if you continue to stick with the HTTP protocol, your online store will be a sitting duck for cyber criminality. If you’re serious about safety, you must switch to HTTPS.

Created initially to safeguard the particularly sensitive elements of e-commerce sites, such as the payment process, HTTPS is now used to protect whole websites. By embracing this protocol, you will be able to be sure that your visitors’ data will remain safe at all conceivable points.

Protect your Admin Panel

Your Admin Panel is the aspect of your store that is least difficult for cybercriminals to crack. All it takes is for you to set a weak password, and hackers can have a field day when it comes to accessing all of the data you store in the backend of your site.

To protect your Admin Panel, you need to:

If they were to encounter trouble with a cybercriminal while using your online store, you can be sure that your customers will not give you a second chance. They will lose trust in you instantly, and more than likely never return to you again — and they’ll tell everybody that they know to avoid your website in the future, too, for good measure. If you don’t take cybersecurity seriously, you could also even find yourself in hot water with the authorities. The impact cyber criminality could have on your online store is something you should want to avoid at all costs, which is why you must put all of the above advice into practice as soon as possible.

It is not a secret that many people nowadays do not pay much attention when they surf the web at home or at work. There are new data breaches and exploits on a daily basis and still avoiding to take any precautions may result in a catastrophic consequences. Even the biggest corporations are paying millions of dollars so they can improve their cybersecurity and remain safe. However, if you still believe in some of the cybersecurity myths you may put your own computer or even your whole organization to a huge risk. We from CyberDB have decided to bust some of the top 5 cyber security myths and make it clear for you.

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Iran Cyberspace picture

There has been recent focus on alleged Iran cyber activity the past few weeks, spurned on by the publication of a vendor report on Iranian operations.  Per the vendor’s findings, not only was Iran likely behind the activity that was targeting government and private sector in the Middle East, it was implementing National Security Agency exploits that were stolen and dumped into the public domain by the Shadow Brokers group in April 2017.  As recently as late August 2018, Iran is suspected of trying to launch influence operations ahead of the midterm elections.  The conclusion is that Iran is increasingly using asymmetric attacks, particularly via cyberspace, as part of its tool box to conduct retaliatory attacks.

The new reporting comes at a time when Russia’s cyber malfeasance has largely dominated the press, due to its influence operations efforts and election shenanigans, not just in the United States but in other countries as well.  Prior to the Russia focus, North Korea was the focal point with its suspected cyber activities targeting cryptocurrency, and the SWIFT banking transactions before that.  Iran was propelled onto the scene with Operation Ababil

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Baseball player getting to bat

According to 2017 reporting, Major League Baseball believed that the Boston Red Sox, at the time in first place in the American League East, used the Apple Watch to illicitly steal hand signals from opposing teams.  Allegedly, the Apple Watch was used to not only “steal” hand signals from opposing catchers in games using video recording equipment, but transmit the information likely to team trainers.  The theft of such information would help determine the type of pitch that was going to be thrown.  The recording of signals is strictly forbidden by league rules.

When it comes to targeting billion-dollar sports franchises, many would assume that cyber crime would be the foremost cyber actors behind the scenes.  Based on a 2015 report that estimated the professional sports market in North America to have an expected worth of $73.5 billion by 2019, it’s easy to see why.  Indeed, there have been several incidents where cyber crime operations have focused on professional sports teams.  In April 2016, the National Basketball Association Milwaukee Bucks players had their financial documents (player addresses, Social Security Numbers, and compensation) accidentally leaked due to a team employee falling victim to an e-mail scam.  The employee released players’ 2015 IRS W-2 documents to an emailer impersonating the team’s president. Also in 2016, a crippling TeslaCrypt ransomware attack impacted a NASCAR racing team.  An estimated $2 million worth of information was potentially lost prompting payment of the ransom to the criminals.

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Cyber threat

Thus far, there has been no confirmed retaliatory cyber strikes conducted by a victimized government against a suspected aggressor state.  There has been some speculation that after the Sony Pictures attack, the United States “knocked” North Korea off the Internet for a brief period of time, although this has never been corroborated.  Despite being a cyber power, the United States has demonstrated restraint in punishing against those transgressor states it believes to have been orchestrators of cyber attacks against its interests, preferring to level sanctions as a punitive alternative.

The question that governments ask is how to deter hostile acts in cyberspace?  And while an important question to raise, perhaps the reality is that there is no viable answer.  There is a reason why international efforts continually fail when trying to gain consensus on cyber norms, Internet governance, and the legalities and criteria of hacking back – there is lack of a fundamental desire to actually find a solution.  Governments willing to agree to the standards and principles of any of these issues are stating their willingness to abide by them, and while that may fit the current situation, the dynamism of cyberspace has proven unpredictable.  Being cuffed to such an agreement that no longer has relevance while other governments operate without constraints is not an ideal situation.  Therefore, without an agreement in place, the status quo remains.

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According to recent reporting, a suspected nation state hacker group with alleged ties to the Iranian government issued death threats to researchers that had detected their cyber espionage activity.  The researchers were checking a server that they believed to be associated with a specific data breach when they received the message “Stop!!! I Kill You Researcher.”  According to the same report, the server was apparently attached to the attackers’ command-and-control infrastructure.  Active since 2015, the group known as “MuddyWaters” has been observed targeting organizations in Georgia, India, Iraq, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Tajikistan, Turkey, and the United States.  Recently, MuddyWaters has been observed targeting oil and gas entities in the Middle East.  Notably, the group is believed to employ “false flag” operations – similar to what was believed to have been done during the recent Olympics – in which it adopted some of the tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTP) of suspected Chinese hackers to obfuscate the group’s true identity.

 

On the surface, the threat made against the researchers can be viewed as knee-jerk reaction to being tracked by the private sector.  But this does raise the possibility of what hostile actors may resort to in the future.  The private sector computer security has been aggressively investigating the activities of suspected nation states actors since 2004 when the first report published the activities of a Chinese state entity.  Since that time, several subsequent reports have been provided to the public detailing “advanced persistent threat” operations detailing TTPs and targeting that have ultimately been attributed to specific nation state actors.  While the standard public reaction of these governments has been to refute or deny the claims, citing the difficulties in providing adequate evidence that supports attribution, sanctions and alleged retaliatory strikes have been know to occur as a result of these accusations.

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