Cloud computing is a simple way for companies to upscale their operations without incurring huge infrastructural costs. Firms currently use an average of 8 clouds and expect this to increase to around 11 by the end of 2023.

The cloud industry is enjoying unprecedented growth and will hit a new high in 2022. Forecasts suggest that the market will be worth a whopping $397 billion by the end of the year. 

What This Growth Means for Your Company

The increasingly competitive market makes it easier for your firm to secure a reasonable rate. As the market grows, we’ll see more cost-effective, innovative solutions coming to the fore. Firms will have more opportunities to save money using these products. 

The downside of the growing cloud industry is the increase in cyber attacks. PayPal, for example, processed transactions worth $936 billion. What self-respecting hacker won’t try to get a piece of that action? 

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The global cloud computing market is set to reach $623.3 billion by 2023. The cloud is the ultimate tool in building highly scalable and flexible networks that can be set up in a flash. This offers a great opportunity for businesses looking to avoid high sunk costs in setting up infrastructure or, in phasing out legacy infrastructure components. Businesses of all shapes and sizes have realized the potential of cloud computing and have either already moved the whole or part of their operations to the cloud already or are in the process of migrating.

But the cloud is a shared resource and identity management, privacy and access control will always remain areas of concern for cloud-based businesses. Managing security for vulnerabilities throughout your operations network has become a top concern for businesses, especially in the wake of COVID-19, remote work and anywhere operations. As more and more people become dependent on the web for their daily work without being physically located in the protective womb of a physical business network, vulnerabilities have risen concomitantly with highly complex attacks, such as, DDoS (distributed denial of service) and Level 7 (application layer) attacks.

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Organizations across the globe have quickly moved to a fast-digital transformation to allow a remote workforce model due to the global pandemic. That has naturally resulted in a multi-fold rise in the IT attack surface of a company. 

That’s why security leaders should consider the added risks carried by the remote workforce as well as their personal devices, which aren’t in the purview of the company’s security measures. This post aims to present you with information about which risks you might be exposed to. Are you ready? Then let’s jump in! 

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Almost all businesses nowadays use web applications for their targeted growth, but these apps’ security is mostly compromised if proper steps are not taken. During the web application development, all other features are given time and preference, but very few pay attention to the web application security they deserve. The vulnerabilities in your web application can be easily exploited by cybercriminals who always remain in search of sites with lower security protection.

Here are one of the most important security practices that you should implement to secure your web application from the most common threats:

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Virtual Private Network (VPN) is a technology that offers total security for all your digital activities. It serves as a barrier against third-party groups, hackers, cyber threats, malware, and sensitive data leakage. 

More than ever, we need to invest with high-end protection to ensure our privacy is never compromised. VPNs are of high demand due to the current condition where most people stay at home and work remotely. With increased online activity, it’s high time to protect your privacy. 

Free VPNs are enticing and offer ‘great’ security without extra cost. Their services are too-good-to-be-true, which you need to doubt and stay away from it. 

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Sarah, an associate employed with EduWorldUSAsays that with the global pandemic of COVID-19, the entire dynamics of how we communicate, work, and collaborate with people has changed. A lot of government, private, and public-sector companies have made it a mandatory requirement for their employees to strictly work from home. For a lot of employees, it is the first time that they are working from home. Now, this might bring in a lot of challenges. In addition to the uncertainties and the stress of this pandemic, we also need to struggle every day with this transition in our work-life habits. It is going to be equally tough for the students who are told to take all their classes from the home online. So, in the tips cybersecurity practices that we have listed below, we not only target the remote workers but also the students. 

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“I’ve read that my web hosting provider’s website that they have a good security solution in place to protect me against hackers.”

This is a pretty common answer that a lot of bloggers and small business owners gave me when I ask them if they know about how secure their web hosting is. Also, they often add that their budgets are pretty tight so they’ve chosen to go with “an affordable provider.” By “affordable,” of course, they mean ‘ridiculously cheap.”

Come on, people.

Do you really think that a cheap web hosting has everything in place to stop a website attack? Do you think that they will protect you from all types of hacker attacks?

While I don’t know everything about how web hosting providers choose security solutions, I can tell you with some confidence that a lot of them have laughable solutions.

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IoT Security in 2019

In recent years, IoT has been on the rise, with billions of new devices getting connected each year. The increase in connectivity is happening throughout markets and business sectors, providing new functionalities and opportunities. As devices get connected, they also become unprecedently exposed to the threat of cyberattacks. While the IoT security industry is still shaping, the solution is not yet clear. In this article, we will review the latest must-know about IoT visibility & security and we will dive into new approaches to secure the IoT revolution.

IoT visibility & security in 2019:

1. IoT endpoint security vs network security

Securing IoT devices is a real challenge. IoT devices are highly diversified, with a wide variety of operating systems (real-time operating systems, Linux-based or bare-metal), communication protocols and architectures. On top of the high diversity, comes the issues of low resources and lack of industry standards and regulations. Most security solutions today focus on securing the network (discover network anomalies and achieve visibility into IoT devices that are active in the network), while the understanding that the devices themselves must be protected is now establishing. The fact that IoT devices can be easily exploited makes them a very good target for attackers, aiming to use the weak IoT device as an entry point to the entire enterprise network, without being caught. Besides that, it’s important to remember that network solutions are irrelevant for distributed IoT devices (i.e., home medical devices), that has no network to protect them.

Manufacturers of IoT devices are therefore key for a secure IoT environment and more and more organizations are willing to pay more for built-in security into their smart devices.

2. “Cryptography is typically bypassed, not penetratedShamir’s law

In recent years we see a lot of focus on IoT data integrity, which basically means encryption & authentication. Though very important by itself, it’s important to understand that encryption doesn’t mean full security. When focusing mainly on encryption & authentication, companies forget that the devices are still exposed to cybersecurity vulnerabilities that can be used to penetrate the device and receive access into the decrypted information, thus bypassing the authentication and encryption entirely. In other words, what’s known for years in the traditional cyber industry as Shamir’s law should  now make its way to the IoT security industry: “Cryptography is typically bypassed, not penetrated” and therefore companies must invest in securing their devices from cyber attacks and not just handle data integrity. To read more about that, please visit Sternum IoT Security two-part blog post.

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Serverless Security Best Practices

According to a study by LogicMonitor, the number of applications hosted on-premises will decrease by 10%, to 27%, by 2020. In comparison, the number of cloud-native, more specifically serverless hosted applications, like AWS Lambda, Google Cloud and Microsoft Azure, will increase to 41%.

The trend to cloud, specifically serverless, and away from on-prem, is not new and of no surprise, as serverless hosted applications provide developers with a faster speed to market and allows for them to release new functionality on a more frequent basis. In addition, it can save organizations bundles in infrastructure costs. It has however left DevSecOps and security teams in a quandary. While they don’t want to impede development efforts, they are left with no choice but to place the security of serverless applications in someone else’s hands.

To alleviate this issue, there are several serverless security best practices that must be put in place in order to properly secure serverless apps launched by the developer.

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Amazon Web Services (AWS) offers a huge variety of benefits for businesses, and organisations are increasingly opting for cloud solutions for their data, website, and applications. However, there are still some businesses using AWS that have not put the proper cyber security controls in place. Here we take a look at ten great tips to improve your AWS cyber security.

  1. Understand your responsibilities

When you work with any kind of web services provider you need to understand what you are responsible for and what will be managed by the provider. This is absolutely true in terms of AWS – where Amazon runs its so-called ‘shared responsibility model’. In this model AWS is responsible for protecting the infrastructure of the AWS cloud system including hardware, software, and networking.

On the other hand, you as the customer is responsible for customer data, identity and access management, firewall and anti-virus configuration, and issues such as data encryption. It can sometimes be necessary to work with outside agencies to manage your own cyber security.

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